Home   About   Academics   Admissions   Events   People   Projects   Research   Resources   


  Projects
     . Faculty Projects:
           .
Samples
           . Sponsored
           . Research
           .
Consultancy
           . Procedure
           . Ongoing

     . Student Projects:

           .
Samples
           . Sponsorship
           . Guidelines

     . Recent Projects



 

Game Design at IDC

Game design is a new two week elective course in IDC, offered to student groups across disciplines like product design, visual communication, interaction design and animation. The elective involves children in the process of design and ends with they play-testing the games. Most games are a mix of fun and education.

First elective was offered in 2007 and the games were picked by Funskool India for production and marketing. The four games shown here are a part of the six developed by the students. They are already in the market and are doing very well. Other two will hit the market shortly.

Games are as follows:


'Zero Sum'- An educational game based on maths, designed by Industrial Design Center was launched by Gakken, Japan on 1st may in the presence of Indian Ambassador, Gakken officials and other dignitaries. Zero Sum was designed by students Priya Ganadas, Chandni Kabra and alumnus Ashish Ganu under the guidance of Prof Athavankar. The game was designed to playfully teach children (age group 6 and above) basic arithmetic operations and order of operations, focusing on achieving a high repeat play value even after the concept of the game is understood.

Game consists of number chips, power cards and zero badges and can be played in a group of 4 to 5. Zero Sum was conceived during Prof Athavankar's 'Game Design' module last year and was later redesigned to suit Japanese audience

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Gotcha: whose profession is it anyway! Designed for 8+ age group. It is to be played with parents as well as friends. It develops memory retention power and also imparts knowledge of professions indirectly in a playful way.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Sixteen Fixteen:
Jus’ square it off! Designed for 8+ age group, it requires players to complete the square made from three random shapes. The child uses his tactile sense to choose the pieces and visualizes how it will fit the square. It is expected to develop spatial memory and intelligence.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Triplets:
Outplay the ordinary. For 8+, it requires developing strategies to visualize line formation of set of your own three pieces, while preventing the opponent to create his formations. Projecting potential moves on to the board (like in chess) is expected to develop spatial intelligence.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


Chakra View:
Master the arc of winning. For 10+, it demands developing strategies that protect your pieces while capturing your opponent’s pieces by circling around it. Clever moves allow windfall gains by multiple captures in a single move.

To follow
The games designed by current students in 2009 are equally exciting and will hit the market next year.


Home > ProjectsRecent Projects